Greek Mythography in the Roman World (American Classical Studies)

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Gillespie —80 Dict. Diehl, Anthologia Lyrica Graeca ; 2nd edn. Poetarum Romanorum veterum reliquiae Diels, Dox. Digesta Din. Dinarchus Dio Cass. Dio Cassius Dio Chrys. Dio Chrysostomus Orationes Diocl. Diocles of Magnesia Dio Cocc. Dio Cocceianus; see Dio Chrys. Diodorus Siculus Diogenian. Diogenianus Paroemiographus Diog. Diogenes Laertius Diom. Diomedes Grammaticus Dion. Dionysius Calliphontis filius Dion.

De veterum censura Dion. Thrax Dionysius Thrax Dionys. Dionysius Periegeta Diss. Diels and W. Kranz, Fragmente der Vorsokratiker , 6th edn. Vacant, E. Mangenot, and E. Amann, 15 vols. Poets J. Duff, Minor Latin Poets Loeb, ; repr. Edmonds, Fragments of Attic Comedy 3 vols. Ehrenberg and A. Fowler, Early Greek Mythography 1 , 2 Enc.

Encyclopaedia Britannica Enc. Enciclopedia Iranica , ed. Enciclopedia Virgiliana , 5 vols. Epistula Eph. Kaibel, Epigrammata Graeca ex lapidibus conlecta Epiph. Epiphanius, Adversus haereses Epit. Epitome Epit. Epitome de Caesaribus in Teubner Aur. Pichlmayer , —76 Epit. Etymologicum Magnum Euc. Euclid Eudem. Eudemus Eunap. Eustathii prooemium commentariorum Pindaricorum , ed. Schneidewin Eutocius, In Arch.

Eutocius, In Archimedis circuli dimensionem Etur. Lindsay's second edn. De errore profanarum religionum Fittschen and Zanker K. Fittschen and P. Forbes, Studies in Ancient Technology , 9 vols. Fornara ed. Frank, Econ. Survey T. Frank ed. An Economic Survey of Ancient Rome , 5 vols. Fraser, Ptolemaic Alexandria , 3 vols. Frere, Britannia ; 3rd edn. Beck and U. Cornell ed. Life L. Strategemata Fronto, Ep. Hollis, Fragments of Roman Poetry c. Mitologiae tres libri Funaioli, Gramm. Funaioli, Grammaticae Romanae fragmenta , vol. Gabba and G. Vallet eds. Hope Simpson and O.

Gaius, Institutiones Gal. Collitz and others, Sammlung der griechischen Dialektinschriften — Gell. Gerber ed. Aratea Gesch. Gjerstad, Early Rome , 6 vols. Glotz, R. Cohen, and P. Roussel, Histoire grecque vols. Gomperz T. Gomperz, Griechische Denker ; Eng. Gow and D. Greenidge, A. Clay, and E. Gray, Sources for Roman History, —70 bc ; 2nd edn.

Gloria martyrorum Grenier, Manuel A. Campbell ed. Heubeck, S. West, and J. History of Greece 2nd edn. Harpocration Harv. Harvard Studies in Classical Philology Harv. Hastings, Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics , 12 vols. Gomme, A. Andrewes, and K. Dover, A Historical Commentary on Thucydides , 5 vols. Herodianus Hdt. Herodotus Head, Hist. Head, Historia Numorum , 2nd edn. Heath, History of Greek Mathematics , 2 vols. Heitsch ed. Folge, 49 ; 2 , 58 Heliod.

Heliodorus, Aethiopica Hell. Hellenica Oxyrhynchia Heph. Hephaestion Heraclid. Heraclides Ponticus Hercher, Epistolog. Herodas Heron, Pneum. Heron, Pneumatica Herzog—Schmidt R. Herzog and P. Theogonia Hesp. Hieronymus, see Jerome Hignett, Hist. Orationes Hippoc. Refutatio omnium haeresium Hist. Hammond ; 2, ed. Hammond and G. Griffith ; 3, ed. Hammond and F. Walbank Hom. Odyssey Hom.

Hymn Dem. Homeric Hymn to Demeter Homil. Satirae or Sermones Hornblower, Comm. Hornblower, Commentary on Thucydides 1: Books 1—3 ; 2: Books 4—5. Hesychius Hyde, Greek Mariners W. Hyde, Ancient Greek Mariners Hyg. Poetica astronomica Hymn. Hymni Magici Hymn. Hymni Orphici Hyp. Hansen and T. Nielsen eds. Ridgway eds.


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Ibycus IC M. Guarducci ed. Rehm, Die Inschriften. Clinton, Eleusis. The Inscriptions on Stone. Crampa ed. Gsell ; 2, ed. Pflaum Il. Degrassi, vol. Kern ed. Against Demosthenes Indo-Germ. Indogermanische Forschungen Ind. Traversa, Index Stoicorum Herculanensis Inscr. Institutiones Iustiniani Instrumenta sacra A. Britain S. Frere ed. Isaeus ISestos J. Etymologiae Isoc. Panegyricus Ist. Istanbuler Mitteilungen It. Itinerarium Alexandri It.


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Dittenberger and K. Jeffery, Local Scripts of Archaic Greece , 2nd edn. Johnston JEg. Journal of Egyptian Archaeology Jer. De script. The Later Roman Empire — Jord. Jordanes, Getica Joseph. Vita Journ. Journal of Biblical Literature Journ. Journal of the History of Biology Journ. Journal of Philology — ; index Journ. Epistulae ps. Orationes Just. Justinus, Epitome of Trogus Justin, Apol.

Justin Martyr, Apologia Juv. Kassel and C. Austin, Poetae Comici Graeci , vol. Kaster, C. Keil, Grammatici Latini , 8 vols. Die Religion der Griechen , 3 vols. Kirk, J. Raven, and M. Schofield, The Presocratic Philosophers , 2nd edn. Klassische philologische Studien , ed. Bickel and C. Klotz ed. Pauly Der kleine Pauly —75 Kl. Moatti ed. Helck, E. Otto, and W. Westendorf eds. Leipziger Studien zur klassischen Philosophie —95 Lenel, Pal.

Lenel, Palingenesia Iuris Civilis , 2 vols. Lauffer ed. Fraser and E. Matthews eds. Osborne and S. Byrne eds. Corsten ed. Libanius Lib. Libri coloniarum Liebs D. Lindsay, Glossaria Latina Lind. Floren, Die griechische Plastik 1 Liv. Livius Andronicus, Odyssia Livy, Epit.

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Periochae Lobeck, Aglaoph. Lobel and D. Stuart Jones —40 ; Suppl. Barber and others LSS F. Steinby ed. Vitarum auctio Lucil. Lucilius Lucr. Lucretius Lugli, Fontes G. Alexandra Lycurg. Against Leocrates Lydus, Mens. De ostentis Lys. Saturnalia Magie, Rom. Rule Asia Min. Malcovati, Oratorum Romanorum Fragmenta 2nd edn. Manitius, Gesch. Marcellinus Marm. Mau, 2 vols. These together make up vol. Marquardt and T. Spectacula Mart. Martianus Capella Marx F. Marx, C. Mattingly, E. Sydenham, and others Roman Imperial Coinage —67 ; rev.

Sutherland and R. Carson M. Marcus Aurelius, Meditations Mazard J. Meleager, Stephanus Mem. Samia Men. Menander Rhetor Mette H. Michel, Recueil d'inscriptions grecques —27 Michell, Econom. Michell, The Economics of Ancient Greece , 2nd edn. Wiegand ed. Millar, The Emperor in the Roman World ; 2nd edn.

Octavius Mir. De mirabilibus auscultationibus auctor ignotus Mitteis, Chr. Mitteis and U. Meiggs and D. MacDonald and G. Gesammelte Schriften , 8 vols. Monumentum Ancyranum Mon. Morel ; 2nd edn. Adelsparteien F. Gauly, L. Musonius Rufus MW M. McCrum and A. Merkelbach and M. Furumark, Mycenaean Pottery Myth. Mythographi Vaticani , ed. Bode Back to top Nachr. Naevius, fragmenta comoediarum Nash, Pict.

Rome E. Nash, Pictorial Dictionary of Ancient Rome —2; 2nd edn. Eclogae Nep. Timotheus [ Neue ] Jahrb. Preminger and T. Brogan eds. Theriaca Nic. Nilsson, Griechische Feste v. Ausschluss d. Nonius Nonnus, Dion. Nonnus, Dionysiaca Norden, Ant. Norden, Die antike Kunstprosa, vom 6. Zeit d. Renaissance , repr. Novellae Nov. Novellae Theodosianae NP. Cary and others eds. Hammond and H. Scullard eds. Cross and E. Livingstone, 2nd edn. Ogden ed. Livy 1—5 R. Its 14 chapters each by a different specialist systematically cover Ovid's life, his style, each of his works, his reputation among later Roman poets and in the Middle Ages, and the manuscript transmission of his texts.

Despite the book's multiple authorship, Boyd imposed a uniformity of approach and format that makes this truly a book and not merely a collection of related essays. The goal, nicely achieved in each case, was "a balance between a comprehensive overview of a particular topic and a focused analysis of some aspect of it. Where important differences exist in interpretation, the contributors take sides while always judiciously indicating what the alternative approaches are, or have been.

English translations are provided for all Latin quotations. Recommended for any library supporting the study of Ovid or of authors or periods for which Ovid is important i. B Online : The present volume provides a comprehensive guide to one of the most difficult authors of classical antiquity. All the major aspects of Propertius' work are dealt with in contributions by renowned specialists. Due space is also given to the reception of the author.

At the centre stands an interpretation of the four transmitted books. Boston : Brill, Each chapter offers an authoritative and state-of-the-art survey of current thinking and research in a particular subject area, as well as covering a wide variety of thematic angles.

Recent advances in scholarship have raised new questions about Sophocles and Greek tragedy, and have overturned some long-standing assumptions. Besides presenting a comprehensive and authoritative guide to understanding Sophocles, this companion provides scholars and students with compelling fresh perspectives upon a broad range of issues in the field of Sophoclean studies.

New York : Brill, c C66 : This handbook for the reading of early Greek poetry is intended to be both a manual for teachers and a guide for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. It covers poetry in the elegiac and iambic genres, as well as melic poetry which is provisionally divided into the personal and the public. The book takes a critical look at scholarly trends applied in interpreting this poetry, exploring, for example, the problems of defining the nature of the elegiac genre, the origins of iambic poetry, the personal voice used by the poets, and the validity of historical criticism.

Appearing in the Classical Tradition series, it considers the impact of modern literary theory on the reading of these texts - for instance the new interpretations suggested by feminism - and guides readers to a full bibliography on scholarly debates from the 19th century to the present. The second part comprises four chapters which shed light on the three periods of Greek Comedy, beginning with a clear-eyed presentation of fifth-century comedy a separate chapter is justly reserved for Aristophanes alone and continuing with informative discussions of Middle Comedy and New Comedy. The third and last part includes another four chapters exploring in depth crucial aspects of Greek Comedy such as the manuscript tradition of Aristophanes, the study of comic fragments, structure and metre, and last but not least the language of Old Comedy.

New York : E. Brill, H Main Library DF T6 B75 Also available online : The first wide-ranging collective work on Thucydides in 38 years, this volume reflects the change in focus during those years from Thucydides' method of investigation and his values to his modes of representation and his thinking. It also registers a new interest in interpretations based on sociological and political categories, from the author's philosophy of history to his self-awareness as a writer. The 32 contributors, who are international scholars in classics and history, provide a survey of current trends in Thucydidean studies, covering Thucydides' life, intellectual milieu, predecessors, rhetoric, historical method, narrative techniques, reliability as a historian, and his legacy.

The papers include discussions of warfare, religion, democracy, oligarchy and the invention of political science. However, these have focused chiefly on the philosophical and literary aspects. This book aims to examine the development of political autobiography and memoirs in the Greek and Roman world, stressing, instead, the relation of a single work with the traditions of the genre and also the influence of the respective aims of the authors on the composition of autobiographies.

At times these works were written as a means of propaganda in a political struggle, or to defend a past action, and often to furnish material to historians. Nonetheless, they still preserve the personal viewpoint and voice of the protagonists in all their vividness, even if distorted by the aim of defending their record. Political Autobiographies and Memoirs in Antiquity will be a highly valuable and useful reference tool for both scholars and students of Greek and Roman history and literature. C36 : This Companion provides a comprehensive overview of the major themes and topics pertinent to ancient Greek law.

Many of the 22 essays, written by an international team of experts, cover procedural and substantive law in classical Athens, but significant attention is also paid to legal practice in the archaic and Hellenistic eras. The essays offer substantial evidence of legal practice in Crete and Egypt, as well as the intersection of law with religion, philosophy, political theory, rhetoric, and drama. C : Offers a guide to understanding the central texts and problems in ancient Greek political thought, from Homer through the Stoics and Epicureans.

Composed of essays specially commissioned for this volume and written by leading scholars of classics, political science, and philosophy, the Companion brings these texts to life by analyzing what they have to tell us about the problems of political life. Focusing on texts by Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle, among others, they examine perennial issues, including rights and virtues, democracy and the rule of law, community formation and maintenance, and the ways in which theorizing of several genres can and cannot assist political practice.

C36 Also available online : Rhetoric thoroughly infused the world and literature of Graeco-Roman antiquity. This Companion provides a comprehensive overview of rhetorical theory and practice in that world, from Homer to early Christianity, accessible to students and non-specialists, whether within classics or from other periods and disciplines. Its basic premise is that rhetoric is less a discrete object to be grasped and mastered than a hotly contested set of practices that include disputes over the very definition of rhetoric itself.

This volume provides an overview of the shape and scope of the problems while also identifying core themes and propositions: for example, persuasion, virtue, and public life are virtual constants. But they mix and mingle differently, and the contents designated by each of these terms can also shift. C : Offers thirty-one original essays by leading historians, classicists and archaeologist on the largest metropolis of the Roman Empire. While the Colosseum, imperial palaces and Pantheon are famous features of the Roman capital, Rome is addressed in this volume primarily as a city in which many thousands of men and women were born, lived, and died.

The clearly written and succinct chapters discuss numerous issues related to the capital of the Roman Empire: from the monuments and the games to the food- and water supply, from policing and riots to domestic housing, from death and disease to pagan cults and the impact of Christianity. Richly illustrated and designed as a readable survey accessible to all audiences, the Companion explains ground-breaking new research against the background of current debate and reaches a level of sophistication that will be appreciated by the experts.

C36 : Listed under the Ancient Philosophy tab. C : Provides a wide-ranging synthesis of history, society, and culture during the formative period of Ancient Greece, from the Age of Homer in the late eighth century to the Persian Wars of BC. In ten clearly written and succinct chapters, leading scholars from around the English-speaking world treat all aspects of the civilization of Archaic Greece, from social, political, and military history to early achievements in poetry, philosophy, and the visual arts.

Archaic Greece was an age of experimentation and intellectual ferment that laid the foundations for much of Western thought and culture. Individual Greek city-states rose to great power and wealth, and after a long period of isolation, many cities sent out colonies that spread Hellenism to all corners of the Mediterranean world. This Companion offers a vivid and fully documented account of this critical stage in the history of the West.

C36 : Listed under Ancient Philosophy tab. A7 C37 : One of the most influential works in the history of political theory, Aristotle's Politics is a treatise in practical philosophy, intended to inform legislators and to create the conditions for virtuous and self-sufficient lives for the citizens of a state. In this Companion, distinguished scholars offer new perspectives on the work and its themes.

After an opening exploration of the relation between Aristotle's ethics and his politics, the central chapters follow the sequence of the eight books of the Politics, taking up questions such as the role of reason in legitimizing rule, the common good, justice, slavery, private property, citizenship, democracy and deliberation, unity, conflict, law and authority, and education. The closing chapters discuss the interaction between Aristotle's political thought and contemporary democratic theory.

The volume will provide a valuable resource for those studying ancient philosophy, classics, and the history of political thought. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, C29 : Cicero was one of classical antiquity's most prolific, varied and self-revealing authors.

His letters, speeches, treatises and poetry chart a political career marked by personal struggle and failure and the collapse of the republican system of government to which he was intellectually and emotionally committed. They were read, studied and imitated throughout antiquity and subsequently became seminal texts in political theory and in the reception and study of the Classics.

This Companion discusses the whole range of Cicero's writings, with particular emphasis on their links with the literary culture of the late Republic, their significance to Cicero's public career and their reception in later periods. Cambridge, U. C35 : Listed under Ancient Philosophy tab. He was a prolific writer on anatomy, physiology, diagnosis and prognosis, pulse-doctrine, pharmacology, therapeutics, and the theory of medicine; but he also wrote extensively on philosophical topics, making original contributions to logic and the philosophy of science, and outlining a scientific epistemology which married a deep respect for empirical adequacy with a commitment to rigorous rational exposition and demonstration.

He was also a vigorous polemicist, deeply involved in the doctrinal disputes among the medical schools of his day. This volume offers an introduction to and overview of Galen's achievement in all these fields, while seeking also to evaluate that achievement in the light of the advances made in Galen scholarship over the past thirty years. Michael Walton. C26 : This series of essays by prominent academics and practitioners investigates in detail the history of performance in the classical Greek and Roman world.

Beginning with the earliest examples of 'dramatic' presentation in the epic cycles and reaching through to the latter days of the Roman Empire and beyond, this Companion covers many aspects of these broad presentational societies. Dramatic performances that are text-based form only one part of cultures where presentation is a major element of all social and political life. Individual chapters range across a two thousand year timescale, and include specific chapters on acting traditions, masks, properties, playing places, festivals, religion and drama, comedy and society, and commodity, concluding with the dramatic legacy of myth and the modern media.

The book addresses the needs of students of drama and classics, as well as anyone with an interest in the theatre's history and practice. New York : Cambridge University Press, C27 : Greek comedy flourished in the fifth and fourth centuries BC, both in and beyond Athens. Aristophanes and Menander are the best-known writers whose work is in part extant, but many other dramatists are known from surviving fragments of their plays.

This sophisticated but accessible introduction explores the genre as a whole, integrating literary questions such as characterisation, dramatic technique or diction with contextual ones for example audience response, festival context, interface with ritual or political frames. In addition, it also discusses relevant historical issues political, socio-economic and legal as well as the artistic and archaeological evidence. The result provides a unique panorama of this challenging area of Greek literature which will be of help to students at all levels and from a variety of disciplines but will also provide stimulus for further research.

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C26 : Greek lyric poetry encompassed a wide range of types of poem, from elegy to iambos and dithyramb to epinician. It particularly flourished in the Archaic and Classical periods, and some of its practitioners, such as Sappho and Pindar, had significant cultural influence in subsequent centuries down to the present day. This Companion provides an accessible introduction to this fascinating and diverse body of poetry and its later reception.

It takes account of the exciting new papyrus finds and new critical approaches which have greatly advanced our understanding of both the corpus itself and of the sociocultural contexts in which lyric pieces were produced, performed and transmitted. Each chapter is provided with a guide to further reading, and the volume includes a chronology, glossary and guide to editions and translations. C36 Also available online : A unique resource, 'The Cambridge Companion to Greek Mythology' is essential reading for understanding not only Greek myth, but also its enormous impact on art, architecture, literature, politics and philosophy across the ages.

More than a compendium of isolated facts, 'The Cambridge Companion to Greek Mythology' is thoughtfully composed by a team of international experts who highlight important themes in three sections. The first part examines oral and written Greek mythology and the uses of these myths from the epic poetry of the eighth century BC to the mythographic catalogs of the early centuries AD.

The second section looks at the relationship between ancient Greek myth and Greek culture and investigates the Roman appropriation of the Greek mythic tradition. Section three follows the reception of Greek myth from the Middle Ages to modernity, taking in such factors as feminist scholarship, cinema and literature. Important for its reach and breadth, its integrated approach and its up-to-date treatment, 'The Cambridge Companion to Greek Mythology' is fundamental for anyone seeking a broader understanding of the myths and their influence on western tradition.

E28 Also available online : This book presents ancient Greek tragedy in the context of late-twentieth-century reading, criticism and performance. The twelve chapters, written by seven distinguished scholars, cover tragedy as an institution in the civic life of ancient Athens, a range of approaches to the surviving plays, and changing patterns of reception, adaptation and performance from antiquity to the present. C36 Also available online : Popularly known as the 'Father of History', Herodotus is the first major prose writer in the history of Western literature whose work has survived in full.

At a time when the ancient Greeks' knowledge of the past relied on orally transmitted memories, he was a pioneering historical practitioner who explored the interplay of myth and history and the role of narrative in history. Contributors to this volume analyze Herodotus' Histories and their influence. Taking a thematic approach, they explore the Histories and their context, techniques and themes, representation of the Greeks' relationships with foreigners and reception.

C Also available online : The two Homeric poems, the Iliad and the Odyssey, have long been considered masterpieces, and their influence on subsequent Greek and Western literature has been immense.

Cicero Quotation

An international team of experts discusses the poems, their background and composition, and subsequent reception to the present day. Each chapter features contemporary critical insights and closes with a guide to further reading on the topic. C28 Also available online : Horace is a central author in Latin literature. His work spans a wide range of genres, from iambus to satire, and odes to literary epistle, and he is just as much at home writing about love and wine as he is about philosophy and literary criticism.

He also became a key literary figure in the regime of the Emperor Augustus. In this volume a superb international cast of contributors present a stimulating and accessible assessment of the poet, his work, its themes and its reception. This provides the orientation and coverage needed by non-specialists and students, but also suggests provoking perspectives from which specialists may benefit.

Since the last general book on Horace was published half a century ago, there has been a sea-change in perceptions of his work and in the literary analysis of classical literature in general, and this territory is fully charted in this Companion. E6 C36 : Latin love elegy is one of the most important poetic genres in the Augustan era, also known as the golden age of Roman literature. This volume brings together leading scholars from Australia, Europe and North America to present and explore the Greek and Roman backdrop for Latin love elegy, the individual Latin love elegists both the canonical and the non-canonical , their poems and influence on writers in later times.

The book is designed as an accessible introduction for the general reader interested in Latin love elegy and the history of love and lament in Western literature, as well as a collection of critically stimulating essays for students and scholars of Latin poetry and of the classical tradition. C33 also available online : Lucretius' didactic poem De rerum natura 'On the Nature of Things' is an impassioned and visionary presentation of the materialist philosophy of Epicurus, and one of the most powerful poetic texts of antiquity. After its rediscovery in it became a controversial and seminal work in successive phases of literary history, the history of science, and the Enlightenment.

In this Cambridge Companion experts in the history of literature, philosophy and science discuss the poem in its ancient contexts and in its reception both as a literary text and as a vehicle for progressive ideas. The Companion is designed both as an accessible handbook for the general reader who wishes to learn about Lucretius, and as a series of stimulating essays for students of classical antiquity and its reception. It is completely accessible to the reader who has only read Lucretius in translation.

C28 also available online : A companion to one of the greatest writers of classical antiquity, and arguably the single most influential ancient poet for post-classical literature and culture, is long overdue. Chapters by leading authorities discuss the backgrounds and contexts for Ovid, the individual works, and his influence on later literature and art.

Coverage of essential information is combined with exciting new critical approaches. C28 : Listed under Ancient Philosophy tab. P6 C36 : This Companion provides a comprehensive account of this outstanding work, which remains among the most frequently read works of Greek philosophy, indeed of Classical antiquity in general. The sixteen essays, by authors who represent various academic disciplines, bring a spectrum of interpretive approaches to bear in order to aid the understanding of a wide-ranging audience, from first-time readers of the Republic who require guidance, to more experienced readers who wish to explore contemporary currents in the work's interpretation.

The three initial chapters address aspects of the work as a whole. They are followed by essays that match closely the sequence in which topics are presented in the ten books of the Republic. Since the Republic returns frequently to the same topics by different routes, so do the authors of this volume, who provide the readers with divergent yet complementary perspectives by which to appreciate the Republic's principal concerns.

Z7 C36 : Listed under Ancient Philosophy tab. C36 also available online : Satire as a distinct genre was first developed by the Romans and regarded as completely 'their own'. This Companion's international contributors provide a stimulating introduction to the genre and its individual proponents aimed particularly at non-specialists. Roman satires are explored both as generic, literary phenomena and as highly symbolic and effective social activities.

Satire's transformation in late antiquity and reception in more recent centuries is also covered. C36 also available online : Tacitus is universally recognised as ancient Rome's greatest writer of history, and his account of the Roman Empire in the first century AD has been fundamental in shaping the modern perception of Rome and its emperors. This Companion provides a new, up-to-date and authoritative assessment of his work and influence which will be invaluable for students and non-specialists as well as of interest to established scholars in the field. First situating Tacitus within the tradition of Roman historical writing and his own contemporary society, it goes on to analyse each of his individual works and then discuss key topics such as his distinctive authorial voice and his views of history and freedom.

It ends by tracing Tacitus' reception, beginning with the transition from manuscript to printed editions, and concluding with his significance in the twentieth century, particularly his influence on political thought in early modern Europe. C36 : This book is a comprehensive up-to-date survey of the Aegean Bronze Age, from its beginnings to the period following the collapse of the Mycenaean palace system.

In essays by leading authorities commissioned especially for this volume, it covers the history and the material culture of Crete, Greece, and the Aegean Islands from c. Intended as a reliable, readable introduction for university students, it will also be useful to scholars in related fields within and outside classics. The contents of this book are arranged chronologically and geographically, facilitating comparison between the different cultures. Within this framework, the cultures of the Aegean Bronze Age are assessed thematically and combine both material culture and social history.

The Roman Empire collapsed in western Europe, replaced by new 'barbarian' kingdoms, but it continued in Christian Byzantine guise in the eastern Mediterranean. New states and peoples changed the face of northern Europe, while in Iran, the Sasanian Empire developed new theories of power and government. At the same time, the great Eurasian steppe became a permanent presence in the European world. This book treats Attila, the notorious king of the Huns, as both an agent of change and a symbol of the wreck of the old world order. Main Library DG At a time of tremendous change in Rome, Italy, and throughout the Mediterranean world, many developments were underway when Augustus took charge and a recurring theme is the role that he played in influencing their direction.

Written by distinguished specialists from the U. Richly illustrated and designed as a survey accessible to all audiences, it also achieves a level of scholarly sophistication and originality that will be welcomed by the experts. The volume is divided into five sections that examine political history, religion, social and economic history, art, and foreign relations during the reign of Constantine, who steered the Roman Empire on a course parallel with his own personal development. C35 : Dominated by the policies and personality of emperor Justinian I , this period of grand achievements and far-reaching failures witnessed the transformation of the Mediterranean world from Roman to Byzantine.

Twenty specialists explore the most important aspects of the age--including the mechanics and theory of empire, warfare, urbanism, and economy. They also discuss the impact of the great plague, the codification of Roman law, and the many religious upheavals taking place at the time. Samons II. C35 : Mid-fifth-century Athens saw the development of the Athenian empire, the radicalization of Athenian democracy through the empowerment of poorer citizens, the adornment of the city through a massive and expensive building program, the classical age of Athenian tragedy, the assembly of intellectuals offering novel approaches to philosophical and scientific issues, and the end of the Spartan-Athenian alliance against Persia and the beginning of open hostilities between the two greatest powers of ancient Greece.

The Athenian statesman Pericles both fostered and supported many of these developments. Although it is no longer fashionable to view Periclean Athens as a social or cultural paradigm, study of the history, society, art, and literature of mid-fifth-century Athens remains central to any understanding of Greek history. This collection of essays reveal the political, religious, economic, social, artistic, literary, intellectual, and military infrastructure that made the Age of Pericles possible.

C36 also available online : The Greek and Roman novels of Petronius, Apuleius, Longus, Heliodorus and others have been cherished for millennia, but never more so than now. The Cambridge Companion to the Greek and Roman Novel contains nineteen original essays by an international cast of experts in the field. The emphasis is upon the critical interpretation of the texts within historical settings, both in antiquity and in the later generations that have been and continue to be inspired by them. All the central issues of current scholarship are addressed: sexuality, cultural identity, class, religion, politics, narrative, style, readership and much more.

Four sections cover cultural context of the novels, their contents, literary form, and their reception in classical antiquity and beyond. Each chapter includes guidance on further reading. This collection will be essential for scholars and students, as well as for others who want an up-to-date, accessible introduction into this exhilarating material.

C35 : Offers fifteen original essays on the Hellenistic world and is intended to complement and supplement general histories of the period from Alexander the Great to Kleopatra VII of Egypt. Each chapter treats a different aspect of the Hellenistic world - religion, philosophy, family, economy, material culture, and military campaigns, among other topics.

The essays address key questions about this period: To what extent were Alexander's conquests responsible for the creation of this new 'Hellenistic' age? What is the essence of this world and how does it differ from its Classical predecessor? What continuities and discontinuities can be identified?

Collectively, the essays provide an in-depth view of a complex world. The volume also provides a bibliography on the topics along with recommendations for further reading. C36 : Offers readers a comprehensive and innovative introduction to the economy of the Roman Empire.

Focusing on the principal determinants, features, and consequences of Roman economic development and integrating additional web-based materials, it is designed as an up-to-date survey that is accessible to all audiences. Five main sections discuss theoretical approaches drawn from Economics, labor regimes, the production of power and goods, various means of distribution from markets to predation, and the success and ultimate failure of the Roman economy.

The book not only covers traditionally prominent features such as slavery, food production, and monetization but also highlights the importance of previously neglected aspects such as the role of human capital, energy generation, rent-taking, logistics, and human wellbeing, and convenes a group of five experts to debate the nature of Roman trade. C35 also available online : No field of Latin literature has been more transformed over the last couple of decades than that of the Roman historians. Narratology, a new receptiveness to intertextuality, and a re-thinking of the relationship between literature and its political contexts have ensured that the works of historians such as Livy, Sallust, and Tacitus will be read as texts with the same interest and sophistication as they are used as sources.

Topics central to the entire tradition, such as conceptions of time, characterization, and depictions of politics and the gods, are treated synoptically, while other essays highlight the works of less familiar historians, such as Curtius Rufus and Ammianus Marcellinus. A final section focuses on the rich reception history of Roman historiography, from the ancient Greek historians of Rome to the twentieth century. An appendix offers a chronological list of the ancient historians of Rome. The key development of the republican period was Rome's rise from a small city to a wealthy metropolis and international capital of an extensive Mediterranean empire.

These centuries produced the classic republican political system and the growth of a world empire. They also witnessed the disintegration of this system under the pressure of internal dissension and boundless ambition of its leading politicians. In this Companion volume, distinguished European and American scholars present a variety of lively, current approaches to understanding the political, military, and social aspects of Roman history, as well as its literary and visual culture.

Designed to be accessible to the general reader and to students, The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic will invite further exploration to a vital, formative period of Roman history and its later influence. Flower, Princeton University. C36 : Examines all aspects of Roman history and civilization from to 49 BC. The key development of the republican period was Rome's rise from a small city to a wealthy metropolis, which served as the international capital of an extensive Mediterranean empire. These centuries produced a classic republican political culture, closely associated with the growth of a world empire.

They also witnessed the slow disintegration of republican government under the relentless and combined pressure of external commitments, growing internal dissension, and the boundless ambition of successful military leaders. In the second edition of this Companion volume, distinguished European, Canadian, and American scholars present a variety of lively current approaches to understanding the political, military, and social aspects of Roman history, as well as its literary and visual culture.

The second edition includes a new introduction, three new chapters on population, slavery, and the rise of empire, and updated bibliographies and maps. C26 : Listed under Ancient Philosophy tab. C35 : This ground-breaking and authoritative volume is an indispensable reference book to accompany the study of Virgil. It is a multi-authored guide aimed at students and anyone with an interest in great literature and the classical heritage. The chapters contain essential information while also offering fresh and original insights into the poems and their author. Emphasis is given to the responses to Virgil over the centuries, particularly by other creative artists.

Drawing on the latest edition of the highly praised Oxford Classical Dictionary, the Companion offers articles on diverse fields such as, history and politics; ethics and morals; law and punishment; social and family life; language, literature, and art; religion and mythology; technology, science, and medicine.

For over 2, years the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome have captivated our collective imagination and provided inspiration for so many aspects of our lives—from culture, literature, drama, cinema, and television to society, education, and politics. Many of the roots of the way life is lived in the West today can be traced to the ancient civilizations, not only in politics, law, technology, philosophy, and science, but also in social and family life, language, and art.

This work incorporates the updates and revisions made to the latest edition of the acclaimed Oxford Classical Dictionary , from which this abridged Companion derives. A revised chronology, bibliography, and thematic listing of entries supplement the A to Z entries. It also contains over 40 new or completely rewritten entries on Greek and Roman society and culture, including ancient perceptions of colour, gender, ghosts, masculinity, sacred laws, and theatricality, as well as new feature entries on topics such as emotions, madness, and ancient conceptions of the senses.

C : This is the first modern commentary on Petronius' Satyrica. It begins with basic background information, then surveys each episode in order that leading themes emerge. Finally, it gives an overview of Petronius' use of literary allusion and symbolism, and of his treatment of sex.

All Latin and Greek quotations have been translated so that this volume may benefit both students of classical and comparative literature. The period also witnessed a violent conflict in Asia Minor between warring peoples in the region, a conflict commonly believed to be the historical basis for Homer's Trojan War.

The Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age Aegean provides a detailed survey of these fascinating aspects of the period, and many others, in sixty-six newly commissioned essays The contents of this book are arranged chronologically and geographically, facilitating comparison between the different cultures. Within this framework, the cultures of the Aegean Bronze Age are assessed thematically and combine both material culture and social history. The Roman Empire collapsed in western Europe, replaced by new 'barbarian' kingdoms, but it continued in Christian Byzantine guise in the eastern Mediterranean.

New states and peoples changed the face of northern Europe, while in Iran, the Sasanian Empire developed new theories of power and government. At the same time, the great Eurasian steppe became a permanent presence in the European world. This book treats Attila, the notorious king of the Huns, as both an agent of change and a symbol of the wreck of the old world order. Main Library DG At a time of tremendous change in Rome, Italy, and throughout the Mediterranean world, many developments were underway when Augustus took charge and a recurring theme is the role that he played in influencing their direction.

Written by distinguished specialists from the U. Richly illustrated and designed as a survey accessible to all audiences, it also achieves a level of scholarly sophistication and originality that will be welcomed by the experts. The volume is divided into five sections that examine political history, religion, social and economic history, art, and foreign relations during the reign of Constantine, who steered the Roman Empire on a course parallel with his own personal development.

C35 : Dominated by the policies and personality of emperor Justinian I , this period of grand achievements and far-reaching failures witnessed the transformation of the Mediterranean world from Roman to Byzantine. Twenty specialists explore the most important aspects of the age--including the mechanics and theory of empire, warfare, urbanism, and economy. They also discuss the impact of the great plague, the codification of Roman law, and the many religious upheavals taking place at the time.

Samons II. C35 : Mid-fifth-century Athens saw the development of the Athenian empire, the radicalization of Athenian democracy through the empowerment of poorer citizens, the adornment of the city through a massive and expensive building program, the classical age of Athenian tragedy, the assembly of intellectuals offering novel approaches to philosophical and scientific issues, and the end of the Spartan-Athenian alliance against Persia and the beginning of open hostilities between the two greatest powers of ancient Greece.

The Athenian statesman Pericles both fostered and supported many of these developments. Although it is no longer fashionable to view Periclean Athens as a social or cultural paradigm, study of the history, society, art, and literature of mid-fifth-century Athens remains central to any understanding of Greek history. This collection of essays reveal the political, religious, economic, social, artistic, literary, intellectual, and military infrastructure that made the Age of Pericles possible. C36 also available online : The Greek and Roman novels of Petronius, Apuleius, Longus, Heliodorus and others have been cherished for millennia, but never more so than now.

The Cambridge Companion to the Greek and Roman Novel contains nineteen original essays by an international cast of experts in the field. The emphasis is upon the critical interpretation of the texts within historical settings, both in antiquity and in the later generations that have been and continue to be inspired by them.

All the central issues of current scholarship are addressed: sexuality, cultural identity, class, religion, politics, narrative, style, readership and much more. Four sections cover cultural context of the novels, their contents, literary form, and their reception in classical antiquity and beyond. Each chapter includes guidance on further reading.

This collection will be essential for scholars and students, as well as for others who want an up-to-date, accessible introduction into this exhilarating material. C35 : Offers fifteen original essays on the Hellenistic world and is intended to complement and supplement general histories of the period from Alexander the Great to Kleopatra VII of Egypt. Each chapter treats a different aspect of the Hellenistic world - religion, philosophy, family, economy, material culture, and military campaigns, among other topics.

The essays address key questions about this period: To what extent were Alexander's conquests responsible for the creation of this new 'Hellenistic' age? What is the essence of this world and how does it differ from its Classical predecessor? What continuities and discontinuities can be identified? Collectively, the essays provide an in-depth view of a complex world. The volume also provides a bibliography on the topics along with recommendations for further reading.

C36 : Offers readers a comprehensive and innovative introduction to the economy of the Roman Empire. Focusing on the principal determinants, features, and consequences of Roman economic development and integrating additional web-based materials, it is designed as an up-to-date survey that is accessible to all audiences. Five main sections discuss theoretical approaches drawn from Economics, labor regimes, the production of power and goods, various means of distribution from markets to predation, and the success and ultimate failure of the Roman economy.

The book not only covers traditionally prominent features such as slavery, food production, and monetization but also highlights the importance of previously neglected aspects such as the role of human capital, energy generation, rent-taking, logistics, and human wellbeing, and convenes a group of five experts to debate the nature of Roman trade. C35 also available online : No field of Latin literature has been more transformed over the last couple of decades than that of the Roman historians.

Narratology, a new receptiveness to intertextuality, and a re-thinking of the relationship between literature and its political contexts have ensured that the works of historians such as Livy, Sallust, and Tacitus will be read as texts with the same interest and sophistication as they are used as sources. Topics central to the entire tradition, such as conceptions of time, characterization, and depictions of politics and the gods, are treated synoptically, while other essays highlight the works of less familiar historians, such as Curtius Rufus and Ammianus Marcellinus.

A final section focuses on the rich reception history of Roman historiography, from the ancient Greek historians of Rome to the twentieth century. An appendix offers a chronological list of the ancient historians of Rome. The key development of the republican period was Rome's rise from a small city to a wealthy metropolis and international capital of an extensive Mediterranean empire.

These centuries produced the classic republican political system and the growth of a world empire. They also witnessed the disintegration of this system under the pressure of internal dissension and boundless ambition of its leading politicians. In this Companion volume, distinguished European and American scholars present a variety of lively, current approaches to understanding the political, military, and social aspects of Roman history, as well as its literary and visual culture. Designed to be accessible to the general reader and to students, The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic will invite further exploration to a vital, formative period of Roman history and its later influence.

Flower, Princeton University. C36 : Examines all aspects of Roman history and civilization from to 49 BC. The key development of the republican period was Rome's rise from a small city to a wealthy metropolis, which served as the international capital of an extensive Mediterranean empire. These centuries produced a classic republican political culture, closely associated with the growth of a world empire.

They also witnessed the slow disintegration of republican government under the relentless and combined pressure of external commitments, growing internal dissension, and the boundless ambition of successful military leaders. In the second edition of this Companion volume, distinguished European, Canadian, and American scholars present a variety of lively current approaches to understanding the political, military, and social aspects of Roman history, as well as its literary and visual culture.

The second edition includes a new introduction, three new chapters on population, slavery, and the rise of empire, and updated bibliographies and maps. C26 : Listed under Ancient Philosophy tab. C35 : This ground-breaking and authoritative volume is an indispensable reference book to accompany the study of Virgil.

Ancient Greek & Roman Writers

It is a multi-authored guide aimed at students and anyone with an interest in great literature and the classical heritage. The chapters contain essential information while also offering fresh and original insights into the poems and their author. Emphasis is given to the responses to Virgil over the centuries, particularly by other creative artists. Drawing on the latest edition of the highly praised Oxford Classical Dictionary, the Companion offers articles on diverse fields such as, history and politics; ethics and morals; law and punishment; social and family life; language, literature, and art; religion and mythology; technology, science, and medicine.

For over 2, years the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome have captivated our collective imagination and provided inspiration for so many aspects of our lives—from culture, literature, drama, cinema, and television to society, education, and politics. Many of the roots of the way life is lived in the West today can be traced to the ancient civilizations, not only in politics, law, technology, philosophy, and science, but also in social and family life, language, and art.

This work incorporates the updates and revisions made to the latest edition of the acclaimed Oxford Classical Dictionary , from which this abridged Companion derives. A revised chronology, bibliography, and thematic listing of entries supplement the A to Z entries. It also contains over 40 new or completely rewritten entries on Greek and Roman society and culture, including ancient perceptions of colour, gender, ghosts, masculinity, sacred laws, and theatricality, as well as new feature entries on topics such as emotions, madness, and ancient conceptions of the senses.

C : This is the first modern commentary on Petronius' Satyrica. It begins with basic background information, then surveys each episode in order that leading themes emerge. Finally, it gives an overview of Petronius' use of literary allusion and symbolism, and of his treatment of sex. All Latin and Greek quotations have been translated so that this volume may benefit both students of classical and comparative literature. The period also witnessed a violent conflict in Asia Minor between warring peoples in the region, a conflict commonly believed to be the historical basis for Homer's Trojan War.

The Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age Aegean provides a detailed survey of these fascinating aspects of the period, and many others, in sixty-six newly commissioned essays Divided into four parts, the handbook begins with "Background and Definitions," which contains chapters establishing the discipline in its historical, geographical, and chronological settings, and in its relation to other disciplines.


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  4. The fourth part, "Specific Sites and Areas," contains chapters examining the most important regions and sites in the Bronze Age Aegean, including Mycenae, Tiryns, Pylos, Knossos, Kommos, Rhodes, the northern Aegean, and the Uluburun shipwreck, as well as adjacent areas such as the Levant, Egypt, and the western Mediterranean. The Oxford Handbook of Byzantine Studies deals with the history and culture of the Byzantine Empire, the eastern half of the Late Roman Empire, from the fourth to the fourteenth century.

    Its centre was the city formerly known as Byzantium, refounded as Constantinople in CE, the present-day Istanbul. Under its emperors, patriarchs, and all-pervasive bureaucracy Byzantium developed a distinctive society: Greek in language, Roman in legal system, and Christian in religion.

    Byzantium's impact in the European Middle Ages is hard to over-estimate, as a bulwark against invaders, as a meeting-point for trade from Asia and the Mediterranean, as a guardian of the classical literary and artistic heritage, and as a creator of its own magnificent artistic style. This volume highlights both the accomplishments of the ancient societies and the remaining research problems, and stimulates further progress in the history of ancient technology. The subject matter of the book is the technological framework of the Greek and Roman cultures from ca.

    Each chapter discusses a technology or family of technologies from an analytical rather than descriptive point of view, providing a critical summation of our present knowledge of the Greek and Roman accomplishments in the technology concerned and the evolution of their technical capabilities over the chronological period. Each presentation reviews the issues and recent contributions, and defines the capacities and accomplishments of the technology in the context of the society that used it, the available "technological shelf," and the resources consumed.

    These studies introduce and synthesize the results of excavation or specialized studies. The chapters are organized in sections progressing from sources written and representational to primary e. The unrivalled breadth and depth of this volume make it the definitive reference work for students and academics across the spectrum of classical studies. It is intended to inform its readers, but also, importantly, to inspire them, and to enable them to pursue their own research by introducing the primary resources and exploring the latest agenda for their study. The emphasis is on the breadth and potential of Hellenic Studies as a flourishing and exciting intellectual arena, and also upon its relevance to the way we think about ourselves today.

    O : The study of Roman sculpture has been an essential part of the disciplines of Art History and Classics since the eighteenth century. Again and again, scholars have returned to sculpture to answer questions about Roman art, society, and history. Indeed, the field of Roman sculptural studies encompasses not only the full chronological range of the Roman world but also its expansive geography, and a variety of artistic media, formats, sizes, and functions.

    Exciting new theories, methods, and approaches have transformed the specialized literature on the subject in recent decades Rather than creating another chronological catalogue of representative examples from various periods, genres, and settings, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Sculpture synthesizes current best practices for studying this central medium of Roman art, situating it within the larger fields of Art History, Classical Archaeology, and Roman Studies.

    This comprehensive volume fills the gap between introductory textbooks and highly focused professional literature. The Oxford Handbook of Roman Sculpture conveniently presents new technical, scientific, literary, and theoretical approaches to the study of Roman sculpture in one reference volume while simultaneously complementing textbooks and other publications that present well-known works in the corpus. The contributors to this volume address metropolitan and provincial material from the early republican period through late antiquity in an engaging and fresh style. Authoritative, innovative, and up-to-date, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Sculpture will remain an invaluable resource for years to come.

    The emphasis is particularly upon the new and exciting links between the various sub-disciplines that make up Roman Studies — for example, between literature and epigraphy, art and philosophy, papyrology and economic history. Connections with disciplines outside classics are also explored, including anthropology, psychoanalysis, gender and reception studies, and the use of new media. Main Library HN R7 O94 : Synthesizes what has been accomplished in this field and attempts to configure the examination of Roman social relations in some new ways, thereby indicating directions in which the discipline might now proceed.

    The book opens with a substantial general introduction that portrays the current state of the field, indicates some avenues for further study, and provides the background necessary for the following articles. It lays out what is known about the historical development of Roman society and the essential structures of that community.

    A second introductory article explains the chronological parameters of the handbook. The main body of the book is divided into the following six sections: mechanisms of socialization primary education, rhetorical education, family, law ; mechanisms of communication and interaction, communal contexts for social interaction ; modes of interpersonal relations friendship, patronage, hospitality, dining, funerals, benefactions, honor ; societies Within the Roman community collegia, cults, Judaism, Christianity, the army ; and marginalized persons slaves, women, children, prostitutes, actors and gladiators, bandits.

    Balot, Sara Forsdyke and Edith Foster. T6 O84 : Contains essays on Thucydides as an historian, thinker, and writer. It also features papers on Thucydides' intellectual context and ancient reception. The creative juxtaposition of historical, literary, philosophical, and reception studies allows for a better grasp of Thucydides' complex project and its intellectual context, while at the same time providing a comprehensive introduction to Thucydides' ideas. It therefore bridges traditionally divided disciplines. The authors engaged to write the forty chapters for this volume include both well-known scholarsand less well-known innovators, who bring fresh ideas and new points of view.

    Articles avoid technical jargon and long footnotes, and are written in an accessible style. Finally, The Oxford Handbook of Thucydides includes a thorough introduction, which introduces every paper, as well as two maps and an up-to-date bibliography that will enable further and more specific study.

    New Releases

    It therefore offers a comprehensive introduction to a thinker and writer whose simultaneous depth and innovativeness have been the focus of intense literary and philosophical study since ancient times. Battles were resolved by violent face-to-face encounters: war was a very personal experience. At the same time, warfare and its conduct often had significant and wide-reaching economic, social, or political consequences. The Oxford Handbook of Warfare in the Classical World offers a critical examination of war and organized violence.

    The volume's introduction begins with the ancient sources for the writing of war, preceded by broad surveys of warfare in ancient Greece and Rome. Also included herein are chapters analyzing new finds in battlefield archaeology and how the environment affected the ancient practice of war.

    A second section is comprised of broad narratives of classical societies at war, covering the expanse from classical Greece through to the later Roman Empire. Part III contains thematic discussions that examine closely the nature of battle: what soldiers experienced as they fought; the challenges of conducting war at sea; how the wounded were treated. A final section offers six exemplary case studies, including analyses of the Peloponnesian War, the Second Punic War, and Rome's war with Sasanid Persia.

    The handbook closes with an epilogue that explores the legacy of classical warfare. Authored by experts in classics, ancient history, and archaeology, this handbook presents a vibrant map of the field of classical warfare studies. Chichester, West Sussex ; Malden, Mass. Written by curators and academics at museums and institutions in Egypt, Europe, and North America, the chapters present definitions and context in framing the current state of the question for each topic, with the time frame deliberately extended into the Greco-Roman period.

    Each chapter concludes with a list of further reading, and both volumes conclude with a bibliography. Major topics include economy, technology, religion in society, social structure and daily life, military institutions and warfare, and settlements, with multiple chapters on each for successive time periods.

    History, literature, and art are arranged into chronological chapters. Four chapters on reception conclude the volume, describing the reception of Egypt in classical antiquity, Europe, Islamic Egypt, and in the museum. Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub. It offers a multi-disciplinary discussion of both longstanding ideas and newer perspectives. This trend has become immensely influential, as it helps us to disclose the tacit assumptions underlying the exercise of political power. But, as a result, the understanding of government itself has fallen behind.

    It constitutes an all-new standard reference work, with an overall focus on institutions and state action, while also addressing, through individual contributions, recent scholarship on ancient Greek political culture. The book covers the wide range of governmental action in Greek antiquity. It explores the multiple manifestations of state action throughout the Greek world. It considers a broad selection of city-states, and governmental realms beyond the polis.

    Chichester, U. Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, The lead article discusses the dramatic changes in scholarly emphasis of the last 30 years that have brought ancient Macedonia to the fore, in particular increased attention to the role played by Alexander the Great's father. Ten maps and a set of 28 plates support this well-organized collection of 27 contributed chapters. Like others in the publisher's Companions to the Ancient World series, this volume is intended primarily as an engaging resource for students new to the subject and scholars in related fields, and yet these "companions" are also useful for scholars within the fields under consideration who seek well-rounded, up-to-date references.

    Articles are specially commissioned to cover political, military, social, economic and cultural history, as well as material culture. C66 Online : Listed under Ancient Philosophy tab. Raaflaub and Hans van Wees. A Companion to Archaic Greece brings together the strands of these developments in a comprehensive survey of one of the most influential periods in Greek history The archaic age, c. No less fascinating are the lesser-known institutions and ideas which were characteristically archaic and did not survive into the classical period In 31 chapters, this Companion systematically covers the literary and archaeological evidence for all regions of the Greek world and all aspects of archaic Greek society and culture, including their Mediterranean context and the impact of non-Greek cultures on their development.

    It will be a welcome introduction for undergraduate students and an invaluable reference tool for the professional historian. C59 also available online : Listed under Ancient Philosophy tab. Provides an accessible overview of eleven centuries of Byzantine society Introduces the most recent scholarship that is transforming the field of Byzantine studies Emphasizes Byzantium's social and cultural history, as well as its material culture Explores traditional topics and themes through fresh perspectives.

    Besides replacing classical epics with personal themes, his poetry includes explicit sexual references. Still, the Roman poet influenced Horace and Virgil. In 27 new and reprinted essays, international scholars present original readings of his major poems in socio-historical context. They also treat his influences notably Sappho , teaching Catullus at the high school and college levels, and translation issues.

    Malden, MA ; Oxford : Blackwell, C66 Online : Examining the profusion of ways in which the arts, culture, and thought of Greece and Rome have been transmitted, interpreted, adapted and used, A Companion to Classical Receptions explores the impact of this phenomenon on both ancient and later societies. Chichester, West Sussex, U. Social history has only recently extended its scope to include women, children, slaves, and foreigners, giving birth to a new definition of "the family" that recognizes the great diversity of family forms in classical antiquity.

    A Companion to Families in the Greek and Roman Worlds draws from both established and current scholarship to offer a broad and interdisciplinary overview of thefield, engage in contemporary debates, and pose stimulating questions about future development in the study of families. But modern deconstructionism doubts the very possibility of objective judgment.

    This work presents the deconstructionist case very well. In 57 essays, all notable for impressive scholarship and concision, a distinguished team of contributors from the US, Britain, and Europe trace social class, educational institutions, political ideologies, and literary aims as decisive influences on classical historiography, first in a series of historical surveys, and then in analyses of individual authors and subgenres. The work concludes with two indexes passages and subjects and a page bibliography, a splendid guide to the scholarship of the last 60 years.

    This is a major work on a major genre of classical literature, with no rival in English or any other language , and it belongs in every collection serving students of Greek and Roman history and literature. Professors to freshmen will find this an indispensable guide to the subject. Sturdy binding, elegant typography, and quality paper justify the price and ensure that the work will serve long and well in every library.

    Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, c Offers a broad survey of ancient political thought from Archaic Greece through Late Antiquity. Approaches ancient political philosophy from both a normative and historical focus. Examines Greek and Roman political thought within historical context and contemporary debate. Explores the role of ancient political thought in a range of philosophies, such as the individual and community, human rights, religion, and cosmopolitanism.

    Views the various practices and discursive contexts of sexuality systematically and holistically. Discusses Greece and Rome in each chapter, with sensitivity to the continuities and differences between the two classical civilizations. Addresses the classical influence on the understanding of later ages and religion. Covers artistic and literary genres, various social environments of sexual conduct, and the technical disciplines of medicine, magic, physiognomy, and dream interpretation.

    Features contributions from more than 40 top international scholars.. An invaluable resource for scholars dealing with the art, material culture and history of the post-classical world. Includes voices from such diverse fields as art history, classical studies, and archaeology and offers a diversity of views to the topic. Features an innovative group of chapters dealing with the reception of Greek art from the Middle Ages to the present.

    Features essays from a prestigious international team of literary experts. Includes coverage of Greek myth? C66 also available online : Covers all aspects of religion in the ancient Greek world from the archaic, through the classical and into the Hellenistic period. Written by a panel of international experts. Focuses on religious life as it was experienced by Greek men and women at different times and in different places. Features major sections on local religious systems, sacred spaces and ritual, and the divine.

    Traces the rise of rhetoric and its uses from Homer to Byzantium. Covers wider-ranging topics such as rhetoric's relationship to knowledge, ethics, religion, law, and emotion. Incorporates new material giving us fresh insights into how the Greeks saw and used rhetoric. Discusses the idea of rhetoric and examines the status of rhetoric studies, present and future.

    All quotations from ancient sources are translated into English. A Companion to Greek Tragedy. The 31 essays are organized into sections on contexts, elements, approaches and reception. The first section surveys the genre's historical, religious, political and artistic background, while the second examines its structural components. Each paper in the segment on approaches exemplifies a particular line of inquiry. The final section traces the interpretative tradition from ancient to modern times.

    Throughout the volume, all ancient Greek is transliterated and translated. Technical terms are explained as they appear. As a result of the generous patronage of Maecenas, wealthy friend and confidant to the Emperor Augustus, Horace produced a genre-spanning body of Latin literature that ranged from iambus and satire to odes and literary epistle.

    Greek Mythography in the Roman World (American Classical Studies)

    Reflecting continual and ongoing reassessments of this timeless Roman poet, A Companion to Horace features a thought-provoking collection of newly-commissioned interpretive essays by leading scholars in the field of Latin literature. Other essays challenge conventional views of the poet's works and influences to expose readers to the most up-to-date perspectives. English translations are provided by the authors for Latin and Greek passages cited in the text, and there are helpful suggestions for further reading about the issues covered in each essay While casting fresh new light on the interpretation and reception of Horace, A Companion to Horace represents an invaluable contribution to the enduring legacy of one of the greatest poets of the Augustan Age of Latin literature.

    After ancient Rome was plunged into civil war, Caesar emerged to become the undisputed master of the Roman world. Indeed, his subsequent assassination in 44 BC marked one of the great turning points in world history as Rome made its epochal transition from republic to empire A Companion to Julius Caesar examines the great man — and great polarizing figure — from a variety of illuminating perspectives: military genius, ruthless tyrant, brilliant politician, first class orator, sophisticated man of letters, and more.

    Essays by leading scholars in classics, ancient history and art, modern history, and European literature approach Caesar from many viewpoints, including that of his contemporaries, and explore how Caesar has been portrayed by artists, writers, and poets from antiquity to the present day. Lively, engaging, and comprehensive in scope, this Companion is one of the richest and most vivid portraits of Julius Caesar available today — a triumphant addition to classical scholarship. Features more than 30 newly commissioned chapters by noted scholars writing in their areas of specialization.